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Brewing Tea.

Brewing Tea

Brewing tea follows a number of guidelines depending on whether the tea is black, green, or white, and often, what region or country it comes from. Here, are recommendations for brewing the Ceylons and Darjeelings that I stock.

But every individual has different tastes and expectations. Therefore, the best way to get the most out of your tea is to experiment with the amount of tea you use per cup and the time you give it to brew for your own personal taste.

All I can offer are a few basic guidelines to help you on your way to brewing the perfect cup.

One very important point to remember whenever you are making tea: “More Tea Stronger, Not Brewed Longer”. Because, if you brew tea longer than the maximum recommended amount of time, it only becomes more astringent and bitter, so, always use more tea for a stronger brew, and always, always brew it for the recommended amount of time.


Water

An excellent cup of tea depends so much upon the quality of water used. Soft water is probably the best. If you live in an area where good tap water is not available I would recommend a soft bottled water.


Black tea, white tea, and green tea.

Some aficionados say that the tea pot must be heated to the same temperature at which the tea was dried. I have done this with some, and it is ideal but takes a lot of research as each tea factory or garden’s temperatures vary. One of these days, I may have all my accumulated data here.


It is also said that the aroma of a black tea brewed correctly will permeate the entire house. Certainly, in our small flat, whenever we brew tea, especially the very fragrant Ceylon’s, this is definitely true.
But here are some basic suggestions. Don’t feel that these are cast in stone though. As I mentioned, at the end of the day, it’s entirely up to how you prefer your tea to taste, how strong you want it, how much brewing time suits you best for the flavour you want. Experiment! It's always such a pleasant journey and at the end of the day, you will get what you want from your tea. And so, we share the love.

 

Black Tea:
• Heat the teapot up with very hot water
• Use 2.5 g of tea to 250mls water
• Discard the water from the teapot
• Add the loose tea
• Add freshly boiled water, boiled to 100°C
• Allow to infuse for 3 – 5 minutes max


Green Tea
• Heat the teapot as for black tea
• Use 2.5 g of tea to 250mls water
• Boil the water and allow it to stand for a minute or so for the temperature   to come down to 75-80°C; and while the water is cooling do the following:
• Discard the water from the teapot
• Add the loose tea
• Add water and allow to infuse for 3 minutes


WhiteTea
• Heat the teapot as for black tea
• Use 2.5 g of tea to 250mls water
• Boil the water and allow it to stand for a minute or so for the temperature to come down to 60-75°C; and while the water is cooling do the following:
• Discard the water from the teapot
• Add the loose tea
• Add water and allow to infuse for 7-10 minutes



Multiple Infusions:

Any high quality tea, whether it is white, green, or black, will yield more than one infusion.

Which means your tea will go further.

First infusion:

·    Boil the kettle, 

·    Boil the kettle for tea

·    Prepare two pots – one for tea, one for decanting

·    Both tea pots should be heated with scalding water

·    Add your desired amount of tea to one pot

·    When the kettle boils, let it stand for one minute then, pour over the leaves

·    Allow to brew for 3 -5 minutes

·    Decant / strain into the second pot and keep the first pot with the wet leaves


Second Infusion:

·    Proceed as with first infusion , using the wet leaf of the first infusion

·    Allow the tea to brew for  5 – 7 minutes.

You can make  a third infusion following the directions as per second infusion.

If you want to make multiple infusions up to 4- 6 times, you will need to use double the amount of black tea.

You can have a lot of fun experimenting with your teas. I always try to encourage note taking buy way of recording; the kind of tea (where it comes from) , the grade ( Pekoe, OP, BOP , FBOP etc.) ,  how long you brewed it for and how well it withstands more than one infusion, and, who you purchased it from.


 


Keeping your own notes with teas you purchase is a great way to recall a really good tea and gives you the chance to become much more practiced with the art of tea and your palate will become more discerning.

Most of all enjoy your tea journey.



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